The Value of Strategy
The Little Things That Hold Us Up.

The Irony of Technology

Technology allows us 24/7 information and virtually unlimited ability for communication and collaboration.  Yet, these same benefits can cause us to insulate ourselves from each other. 

Like anything else technology can be good and bad.  Yes, technology allows us to communicate.  But an email is inferior to a phone call. And a phone call is sometimes inferior to a face-to-face meeting. 

Yes, you can launch a GoToMeeting.com conference and bring people together wherever they are located.  But sitting down in room with each other and brainstorming still has its place.

In order to ensure that we are taking advantage of the benefits of technology, while avoiding the pitfalls, we have instituted Tuesday morning meetings among partners, as well as Thursday lunch meetings with partners.  The agenda for these meetings reflects the mission and priorities of our firm.  We discuss operational issues, cases, client retentions/new clients, and relative workloads on a scale of one to ten.

So when you are setting up your firm built on the foundation of technology, don’t forget to sit down in a room together on a regular basis.  There is still no substitute for looking each other in the eye and patting each other on the back. 

Comments

Greg May

By far the worst aspect of technological advance is the urgency it creates. I remember partner at one of the "Big Law" firms I was at pining away for the "good old days" before fax machines, when you didn't get a faxed demand of one sort or another with a demand for an immediate response or requiring a pleading to be filed the next day. This same partner used to vacation at a dive resort in Baja -- a resort that had no phones, and she didn't take hers, either.

I suspect life for many was better before they got their Blackberries.

GAL

I agree Greg. I dont see that side affect going away. Unless of course you cant be reached as you suggest. Perhaps teh only way to ever unplug will be to go to a place designed to preclude technology.

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